CTL Faculty Learning Communities

Faculty Learning Communities offer faculty a structure for engaging in a topic of mutual interest.

To learn more about the topic of FLCs in higher education refer to the International Journal of Teaching and Learning in Higher Education's article on Exploring Faculty Learning Communities and Cox and Richlin's book titled Building Faculty Learning Communities: New Directions for
Teaching and Learning
.

Past FLC Topics
Faculty Learning Community Updates

Center for Teaching and Learning
Faculty Learning Community (FLC) Call for Applicants
September 2014 – May 2015

*Applications Due Monday, September 22, 2014

The Center for Teaching and Learning is pleased to offer a Faculty Learning Community program.
All full time and part time instructors at Sacramento State are invited to apply here!

What are Faculty Learning Communities (FLCs)?

FLCs are peer led groups of faculty (8-12) that engage in an active, collaborative, and supportive, year–long program with curriculum focused on a particular topic, problem or question. The goal of the FLC is to develop skills, knowledge, and expertise in the area of interest by creating a focused time and space apart from the daily work environment. The products of these FLCs will enable faculty to produce, collect, and evaluate evidence of student learning or secure funding for scholarly or creative projects.

The following FLCs are open for application:

A. Deep Reading and Information Literacy: This FLC will use formative assessment of reading & information literacy skills to increase student motivation and success in lower division foundational GE and major gateway courses.  Participants will begin by using Backward Design to examine existing curriculum, comparing course learning outcomes to outcomes articulated in the AACU Value Rubrics for Reading & Information Literacy. Our action research project will then be to design formative assessment and student engagement strategies to activate deep reading & the diverse skills of information literacy, using peer observation and various assessment tools to evaluate degrees of success. Click here for FLC syllabus.

Facilitators: Joel Dubois, Humanities & Religious Studies, Julie Mumma, Criminal Justice,
Fridays, 2-4 pm: Sept. 26, Oct. 24, Nov. 21, Dec. 12, Jan. 30, Feb. 27, March 20, April 24, May 8
+ Culminating Session: Friday, May 15, 4-6 pm

B. Service Learning: This Faculty Learning Community will focus on understanding and incorporating Service Learning into a previous and/or existing class. Service learning is a terrific way to help students enhance their academic skills by applying what they have learned in your course to the world beyond the classroom.  Additionally, it can be very beneficial for faculty in terms of professional development, expanding scholarly profiles, and networking into the community.  Finally, it helps community-based organizations address their local needs and garner resources for change. By the end of the year, faculty will come away with a completed course syllabus for a service learning course, a description of the their service learning project, potential assignments, and potential community partners.  Click here for FLC syllabus.

Facilitators: Rachel August, Professor of Psychology and Dana Kivel, Interim Director of the Community Engagement Center
Mondays, 3-5 pm: Sept. 29, Oct 27, Nov 10, Dec 8, Feb 9, Feb 23, March 9, April 13, April 27, May 11

C. Teaching and Learning with the iPad (Fall semester only): This mini FLC will consist of 5 hands on sessions that enable participants to use the iPad for teaching in the classroom.  Participants will begin with an overview of current capabilities of cloud storage and sync, wireless connectivity, and campus resources that support mobile technology. Applications for accessing and editing Microsoft Word, Excel, and PowerPoint documents that are comparable and compatible with laptop computer systems will be provided and explored. Multiple modes of presenting curricular material using the iPad will be presented. Participants must have an iPad to apply. iPad accessories and app licenses (ex. keyboard, Office365, VGA adapters, Apple TV, etc. max 250 total) will be provided for each participant. Click Here for iPad Syllabus

Facilitator: Marco Martinez, Information Technology Consultant
Wednesdays, 1:30-3:30 pm: Fall meeting dates only – Oct. 1, Oct. 22, Nov. 12, Dec. 10, and Feb. 4 

D. Math 29, 30, 31  Pre-calculus and Calculus Teaching and Learning: This FLC will focus on the exploration of student thinking and learning in undergraduate gateway Math Courses, including Math 29, 30, and 31, Pre-calculus and  Calculus. Faculty will examine and implement active engagement strategies that improve student learning and success.  There will also be a focus on the implementation of Peer Assisted Learning (PAL), Early Intervention Advising, and the role that student diagnostic exams play in predicting student success.  The FLC has the goal of building a community of reflective instructors to examine the different ways that students construct understanding of mathematics.  Click here for FLC syllabus.

Facilitators: Kim Elce and Tracy Hamilton Professors of Mathematics, Lynn Tashiro, Director for  the Center for Teaching & Learning
Tuesdays 3 pm, Sept. 2014 – May 2015 10 meetings, exact dates TBD

E. Undergraduate Research: Engaging Students in Curricular and Co-Curricular Settings:  Traditionally, undergraduate research (UGR) has been viewed as instrumental for students applying to graduate school, and/or has been primarily focused on STEM fields. More recently, it is being studied as a key High Impact Practice (AAC&U) that increases student achievement and improves graduation rates of all students, regardless of major. This FLC will examine research and strategies from the Council on Undergraduate Research to increase UGR in the curriculum and improve opportunities for all students across disciplines to experience the thrill of creating knowledge (however your discipline defines it). Participants will collaboratively develop a local definition and rubric for UGR; make suggestions for how UGR can be integrated into first year student experiences (through First Year Seminars and Learning Communities); and lead campus conversations regarding UGR. In spring semester, as appropriate, FLC participants will experiment with embedding mini-UGR opportunities in coursework or in the co-curriculum, and analyze effectiveness and the impact on student learning. Click here for UGR Syllabus

Facilitator: Deidre Sessoms, Professor of Teacher Education, Director of Faculty Research Development.
Fridays, 12-2 pm 10/10, 10/31, 11/2, 12/19, 1/30, 2/27, and 2 additional meetings in April and May TBD
+ Culminating Session: Friday, May 15, 4-6 pm
+Tuesday 10/28/14* 9-3, Friday 3/6/15* 11-5
* Campuswide student research presentations are scheduled for these two days; FLC participants will assist at these events during specific 2-hour time slots

F. Grant Writing for the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) and the Common Core State Standards (CCSS): This FLC is a cross-disciplinary faculty learning community designed to align undergraduate science and teacher preparation courses to the Common Core State Standards in English/Language Arts (CCSS-ELA) and Mathematics (CCSS-M) and the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS). This process of curriculum re-design will integrate new content (e.g., engineering), new practices (e.g., standards of mathematical practice), and new paradigms (e.g., cross-cutting concepts in the sciences, differentiation to provide access to all students) into select undergraduate and teacher preparation coursework. In addition to transformed course syllabi, this curriculum design work will inform the development of grant proposals for additional resources to support more systemic and systematic curriculum transformation in alignment with these new national standards.   Click Here for FLC syllabus.

Facilitators: Pia Wong, Professor of Education, Judi Kusnick, Professor of Geology
Meetings: Monthly, beginning in October with tasks assigned between meetings; exact dates TBD by the group 

G. Program Assessment: Critical Thinking and Intercultural Competence: This FLC will engage multidisciplinary faculty teams in a collaborative process to assess one of our Institution Level Learning Outcomes (Baccalaureate Learning Goals).  The assessment project will focus on program outcomes and student work that provides evidence of critical thinking and/or intercultural competence. FLC Participants will build consensus on a set of tools (assignments, rubrics, curricular maps) that can be used to collect and analyze student work.  This student work will serve as direct evidence of the critical thinking knowledge and intercultural competence skills we expect students to attain at graduation from our programs & institution.  This FLC will work to submit a proposal to the 2015 WASC conference.

Facilitators: Amy Liu Professor of Sociology and Director of Program Assessment, Lynn Tashiro Director of the Center for Teaching and Learning.
Meetings: Monthly, beginning in October with tasks assigned between meetings; exact dates TBD by the group

Participation Requirements & Benefits:

  • Full time or Part time Sacramento State employment for the academic year 2014-2015
  • Commitment to attend 10 scheduled FLC meetings and submit all specified deliverables before by deadlines
  • $700 Professional Development Funds awarded upon submission of FLC deliverables  *Except FLC C. Teaching and Learning with the iPad. See description above.
  • A year-long opportunity to reflect and refine your teaching in the company of committed colleagues with similar interests

Full Description of Meeting agendas and deliverables available when you click on the name of each FLC above. Please submit an application here!

Questions? Please contact the Center for Teaching and Learning • 278-5945 • Library 4026 • e-mail: CTL@csus.edu

CTL – FWG ALS Online Application (please read below for more information, before you submit your application!)

Faculty Work Group (FWG) Description

What is a Faculty Work Group (FWG)?

A faculty work group is a group of 8-10 faculty who are committed to making a specific contribution to a CSU system wide initiative or program.  Participants propose individual projects to address initiatives or program outcomes. The FWG is facilitated by CTL mentors and meets as a group to:

1. participate in project specific professional development

2. network, project trouble shoot, and provide peer support

3. disseminate project results

Group meeting frequency, days, and times vary by FWG

The following Faculty Work Group (FWG) is open for application:

A. Affordable Learning Solutions and Student Success:

Description of CSU Initiative: What are Affordable Learning Solutions (ALS)? The CSU system’s Affordable Learning Solution (ALS) Initiative works to provide high quality, affordable, and accessible instructional materials for a variety of disciplines and establish the infrastructure and culture to support ongoing creation and adoption of low cost instructional materials.  Because of the high cost of traditional instructional materials such as textbooks, it is estimated that 30% of students never purchase the instructional materials, from any source, even if they are “required”. To address this problem the CSU has implemented and piloted digital rental, e-book, custom publishing, self-publishing, and open educational resource (OER) options for instructional materials.

ALS Faculty Work Group Objectives: Faculty participants will evaluate current instructional materials for their course and examine a variety of new options for creating, sharing, and providing access to instructional materials.  Faculty mentors with expertise in technology, accessibility, and open educational resources will provide professional development and consultation to faculty participants as they complete a project that reduces the cost and/or improves access for students to instructional materials. Each faculty project will become a case study illustrating how traditional instructional materials can be replaced by a diverse collection of affordable options and accessible pathways.

ALS Faculty Work Group Participants will:

a)  Pilot at least one AL$ change into one or more courses

b)  Minimize cost of instructional materials by using bookstore, library, learning management system, and Open Educational resources.

c)  Document changes in cost of instructional materials and impact on student learning

d)  Complete an assessment report containing evidence of fiscal impact and changes in student learning

Participation Requirements, Benefits, and Agreement:

  • Full time or Part time Sacramento State employment and authority to select instructional materials for Fall 2014 and/or Spring 2015 courses
  • Commitment to attend 3 2-hour FWG meetings. Exact dates and time TBD based on faculty workgroup participant availability
  • Commitment to implement new instructional materials by Spring 2015 semester. Deliverables (pre and post survey of instructional material expenditures by students and final report) due May 1, 2015
  • $1000 Stipends awarded upon submission of FWG final report

Online Application

APPLY HERE!

To find out more about the Faculty Learning Communities for the 2013-2014 sessions, please click on the following:

A. Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) Student Success: In the first semester of the FLC, participants will engage as learners with teaching tools such as student response systems (cards, clickers, poll everywhere), flipped classroom learning (video or audio cast lectures), collaborative learning (problem based, team based, peer led), and learner analytics (for early intervention). Each meeting will model best practice implementation, facilitate faculty practice with the tool, and provide a forum for discussion.  Faculty will select one of the tools to implement in a lesson the following semester.  The implementation will be studied using a combination of peer observation and Action Research. (Facilitators: Judi Kusnick and Lynn Tashiro)

B. Program and University Level Assessment of Student Learning: This FLC will engage multidisciplinary faculty teams in a collaborative process to assess one of our Institution Level Learning Outcomes (Baccalaureate Learning Goals).  The Institution Level Learning outcomes of specific interest are critical thinking, written communication, and information competency. FLC Participants will build consensus on a set of tools (assignments, rubrics, curricular maps) that can be used to collect and analyze student work.  This student work will serve as direct evidence of the critical thinking knowledge and skill we expect students to attain at graduation from our programs & institution. (Facilitators: Amy Liu and Lynn Tashiro)

C. Instructional Materials for the 21st Century Student: Textbooks, e-books, and multimedia learning tools: FLC participants will analyze, revise, and create General Education and First Year Program instructional materials.  These materials include, but are not limited to, traditional paper readers, e-readers, and other items that utilize active engagement, technology and Affordable Learning Solution tools. Participants will experiment with the content and delivery of curricular materials in their course and evaluate their impact on student learning. (Facilitators: Bridget Parsh and Mary Reddick)

D. Undergraduate Research: Engaging Students in Curricular and Co-Curricular Settings: Undergraduate research (UGR) is a High Impact Practice (AAC&U) that increases student achievement and improves graduation rates of all students, regardless of major.  This FLC will examine strategies from the Council on Undergraduate Research on increasing UGR in the curriculum and improving opportunities for all students across disciplines to experience the thrill of creating knowledge. Participants will work together to develop a local definition and rubric for UGR; make suggestions for how UGR can be integrated into first year student experiences and lead campus conversations regarding UGR.  In fall semester, as appropriate, FLC participants will experiment with embedding mini-UGR opportunities in coursework, and analyze the impact on student learning. (Facilitator: Deidre Sessoms)

E. Critical Thinking and Student Discussions: Facilitating Effective Face-to-Face and Online Discussions: This Faculty Learning Community will focus on the use of discussions as a learning tool. The FLC is intended to cover both face-to-face and online discussion settings. Meetings will focus on general discussion setup, facilitation, and feedback/response strategies and techniques as well as specific context and/or approach specific class discussions (discussions for understanding, critiquing, with conflict, and large and small group settings). These meetings will provide participants with the opportunity to practice the concepts and skills learned with their peers. (Facilitator: Carolyn Gibbs and Dan Melzer)

To find out more about what a Faculty Learning Community is, and how to apply, please go here!

 

The Center for Teaching and Learning is offering five Faculty Learning Communities (FLCs).   APPLY HERE!

What are FLCs?

FLCs are peer lead groups of faculty (8-12) that engage in an active, collaborative, and supportive, year–long program with curriculum focused on a particular topic, problem or question. The goal of the FLC is to develop skills, knowledge, and expertise in the area of interest by creating a focused time and space apart from the daily work environment. The products of these FLCs will enable faculty to produce, collect, and evaluate evidence of student learning or secure funding for scholarly or creative projects.

What are the topics for the 2013 FLCs?

A. Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) Student Success: In the first semester of the FLC, participants will engage as learners with teaching tools such as student response systems (cards, clickers, poll everywhere), flipped classroom learning (video or audio cast lectures), collaborative learning (problem based, team based, peer led), and learner analytics (for early intervention). Each meeting will model best practice implementation, facilitate faculty practice with the tool, and provide a forum for discussion.  Faculty will select one of the tools to implement in a lesson the following semester.  The implementation will be studied using a combination of peer observation and Action Research.

 B. Program and University Level Assessment of Student Learning: This FLC will engage multidisciplinary faculty teams in a collaborative process to assess one of our Institution Level Learning Outcomes (Baccalaureate Learning Goals).  The Institution Level Learning outcomes of specific interest are critical thinking, written communication, and information competency. FLC Participants will build consensus on a set of tools (assignments, rubrics, curricular maps) that can be used to collect and analyze student work.  This student work will serve as direct evidence of the critical thinking knowledge and skill we expect students to attain at graduation from our programs & institution.

 C. Instructional Materials for the 21st Century Student: Textbooks, e-books, and multimedia learning tools: FLC participants will analyze, revise, and create General Education and First Year Program instructional materials.  These materials include, but are not limited to, traditional paper readers, e-readers, and other items that utilize active engagement, technology and Affordable Learning Solution tools. Participants will experiment with the content and delivery of curricular materials in their course and evaluate their impact on student learning.

 D. Undergraduate Research: Engaging Students in Curricular and Co-Curricular Settings: Undergraduate research (UGR) is a High Impact Practice (AAC&U) that increases student achievement and improves graduation rates of all students, regardless of major.  This FLC will examine strategies from the Council on Undergraduate Research on increasing UGR in the curriculum and improving opportunities for all students across disciplines to experience the thrill of creating knowledge. Participants will work together to develop a local definition and rubric for UGR; make suggestions for how UGR can be integrated into first year student experiences and lead campus conversations regarding UGR.  In fall semester, as appropriate, FLC participants will experiment with embedding mini-UGR opportunities in coursework, and analyze the impact on student learning.

 E. Critical Thinking and Student Discussions: Facilitating Effective Face-to-Face and Online Discussions: This Faculty Learning Community will focus on the use of discussions as a learning tool. The FLC is intended to cover both face-to-face and online discussion settings. Meetings will focus on general discussion setup, facilitation, and feedback/response strategies and techniques as well as specific context and/or approach specific class discussions (discussions for understanding, critiquing, with conflict, and large and small group settings). These meetings will provide participants with the opportunity to practice the concepts and skills learned with their peers.

What are the participation requirements?

  • Full time or Part time Sacramento State employment between January – December 2014.
  • Commitment to attend 10 scheduled FLC meetings and submit all deliverables before the deadlines.

What are the participations benefits?

  • $700 Professional Development Funds awarded upon submission of FLC deliverables.
  • A year-long opportunity to reflect about and refine your teaching in the company of committed colleagues
    with similar pedagogical interests.

For more information and to apply please download, fill and return the following applications. (DocPDF)

You can also submit an application online, but please make sure that you read the FLC meeting schedule.

A full description of Meeting agendas, FLC syllabus, and deliverables will be available on the CTL website at http://ctl.csus.edu/?cat=20

To find out more about the Faculty Learning Communities for the 2013-2014 sessions, please click on the following:

Using Critical Thinking to Motivate First Year & Junior Transfer Students  

Integrated Learning Across Disciplines: Learning Communities and Collaboratives 

Teaching the First Year Student

To find out more about what a Faculty Learning Community is, and how to apply, please go here!

The Center for Teaching and Learning is offering two Faculty Learning Communities (FLCs).

What are FLCs?

FLCs are peer lead groups of faculty (8-12) that engage in an active, collaborative, and supportive, year–long program with curriculum focused on a particular topic, problem or question. The goal of the FLC is to develop skills, knowledge, and expertise in the area of interest by creating a focused time and space apart from the daily work environment. The products of these FLCs will enable faculty to produce, collect, and evaluate evidence of student learning or secure funding for scholarly or creative projects.

What are the topics for the 2013 FLCs?

A. Critical Thinking and The First Year Student: Using Critical Thinking to Motivate First Year and Junior Transfer Students

This FLC will focus on engaging first year and transfer students in solving real-world problems that develop critical thinking.  The goal will be to develop instructional and assessment tools for communicating clearly to students the nature of critical thinking; the way course activities develop such thinking; the extent of students’ progress in developing it; and the relevance of critical thinking skills across the curriculum and in real-world situations. Action Research will be used to collect data and reflect on student learning. John Tagg’s The Learning Paradigm College will be our guiding source for the year’s sessions. (Facilitator: Joël Dubois)

B. Teaching the First Year Student: Pedagogy, High Impact Practices and Student Development

This FLC will collaboratively engage faculty over a sustained period of time to develop and refine skills in teaching the First Year Student. The goal of this FLC is to produce exemplars of the specific tools (rubrics, classroom activities, campus engagement, etc.) for working with the First Year Student.  Instructors new to teaching First Year Seminar and First Year “Friendly” courses (courses typically taken by First Year Students) are encouraged to participate. (Facilitator: Bridget Parsh)

C. Integrated Learning Across Disciplines: Academic Learning Communities and Collaboratives

This Faculty Learning Community will focus on developing tools and skills to implement best practice pedagogy in Academic Learning Communities. Participants will create activities, lessons, and assignments that integrate across disciplines and practice collaborative teaching and delivery of integrated academic and co-curricular content.  Using curricular tools created by interdisciplinary programs such as the One Book and One World projects as well as cross cutting High Impact Practices such as Service Learning, Undergraduate Research, and Writing Across the Curriculum, faculty will build a portfolio of activities and assignments for use in an academic learning community. (Facilitators: Sheree Meyer and Deidre Sessoms)

What are the participation requirements?

  • Full time or Part time Sacramento State employment between September 2013 – May 2014
  • Commitment to attend 10 scheduled FLC meetings and submit all deliverables by specified deadlines

What are the participations benefits?

  • $750 Professional Development Funds awarded upon submission of FLC deliverables
  • A year-long opportunity to reflect about and refine your teaching in the company of committed colleagues
    with similar pedagogical interests

For more information and to apply please download, fill and return the following applications. (DocPDF)

You can also submit an application online, but please make sure that you read the FLC meeting schedule.

A full description of Meeting agendas, FLC syllabus, and deliverables will be available on the CTL website at http://ctl.csus.edu/?cat=20